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NIck Mallett
Nick Mallett
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Category:
Speaker, MC
Location:
Cape Town South Africa
Preferred Language:
English
Tags:
Commentator,Presenter,Professional Speaker,Professional sports coach,Rugby,Sporting celebrity
Profile:
Nick Mallett is one of the most articulate and magnetic personalities in sport. He truly engages with his audiences when sharing stories and information about his passion, rugby. Nick's presentations include an overview on the current status of Rugby in South Africa and abroad, as well as breaking down certain aspects of the game. As Nick is also involved in a number of businesses, he is always able to customise presentations to incorporate how the same principles used to build successful teams in sport, also come into play in the game of business.

HIs experience as a rugby coach has ensured that he is always in a position to address audiences on past and present rugby related issues.

Nick's coaching experience spans the following:
*1982 – 1983 Coached & played Rugby & taught English in Rovigo, Italy.
*1985 – 1992 Worked & coached/captained rugby in France (St Claude & Boulogne Paris) earning both teams promotion into the first division of the French Rugby Club Championships.
*1994 – 1995 Coached False Bay Rugby Club, Cape Town.
*1996 – 1997 Coached Boland, Assistant Springbok Coach, Emerging Springbok Coach.
*1997 – 2001 Debut October 1997 – South African Springbok Coach (record 38 matches 27 wins – including record equalling 17 consecutive wins)
*2002 – 2004 Coached French 1st Division Club – Stade Francais
*Won French Championship in 2003 & 2004.
Nick Mallett is one of the most articulate and magnetic personalities in sport. He truly engages with his audiences when sharing stories and information about his passion, rugby. Nick's presentations include an overview on the current status of Rugby in South Africa and abroad, as well as breaking down certain aspects of the game. As Nick is also involved in a number of businesses, he is always able to customise presentations to incorporate how the same principles used to build successful te
Synopsis:
How to reach sustainable performance.

In my role as Head coach of various professional and International rugby teams, I have found that following certain basic principles has helped enormously in providing leadership and motivating my staff and players. These principles I believe, have helped me to coach the various teams that I have been responsible for reach sustainable performance. Over the past 12 years I have been in charge of the South African National rugby team, a top French first division club, Stade Francais and the Italian National rugby team. These are completely different types of coaching jobs, in 3 different countries, requiring communication in 3 different languages. All these teams have achieved record breaking results and I am convinced that the following principles of leadership have been a major contributing factor to this success.

1. Set clear goals for the team:

As head coach it is imperative to make absolutely clear what you expect from the staff and team. The goals change depending on the quality of the team you coach. With South Africa the goal was to be the best team in the world, with Stade Francais, it was to win the French Championship, with Italy it was to be competitive in every game we played and to reduce the losing margins to 'best ever' status, thus enabling the team to build confidence in order to start winning. South Africa and Stade Francais were both capable of being the best and Italy, who never play against teams seeded lower in the IRB rankings, needed to start believing that they could beat the superior teams.

2. Provide leadership with clear vision of how to achieve goals:

Having set the goals, the head coach must then provide a clear method whereby the staff and team can achieve these goals. Broadly speaking, South Africa needed to change their style of play, Stade Francais had to create a happier team environment which had become sceptic and Italy needed to learn how to defend successfully before attempting to be too ambitious on attack. With all 3 teams I had to convince them that, by adapting to different strategies, they could succeed.

3. Encourage diversity and practice tolerance.

This was especially important with regard to SA and Stade Francais. SA had recently come out of the Apartheid era and the team was made up of Afrikaners and English speakers and players from different racial groups. Stade Francais was a Parisian team made up of professional rugby players from 7 different countries and various parts of France. In order to succeed, these teams had to understand that the team was far more important than their individual differences. I made sure that everyone understood that I welcomed the diversity and would not pick a player who did not show tolerance to the religious, cultural or racial differences in the squad.

4. Respect the opposition and plan and prepare using all available information. Encourage innovation :

In trying to reach sustainable performance, I wanted the teams that I coached to study and respect the opposition. By understanding their game plans, their starting plays and their key players, my teams were empowered prior to going onto the field. Using individual coaching and the very best video analyses, we are able to predict to a large extent how the opposition will play and then be better prepared to counter them. The input of the players themselves is very important in the process and a great many innovative attacking and defensive strategies have come from them.

5. Appoint assistants who complement you and cover your areas of weakness.

In my case I have a ' big picture ' view of what is required and my strengths lie in 'one on one' communication and individual motivation. I have tried to consistently appoint assistants who are great at detail and organisation, who leave no stone unturned and who insist on making sure we stick to an agreed program. No individual is capable of covering all areas of importance in the smooth running of the team and it is a mistake to appoint assistants who have similar strengths to your own.

6. Have clear channels of communication and be totally honest :

Every staff member must be aware of his responsibilities and the person that he reports to. There must be absolute honesty in the selection process and every player must be clear as to why he is or is not in the team and what he needs to do to improve. This is the head coach's responsibility and although tough at times, it has to be done in an open and honest way. The player may not agree with your decision, but he will respect you for your honesty and will be prepared to work hard to fight to win his place back. The smooth running of the group is the head coach's responsibility too and even though medical and administrative issues are delegated to heads of these sections, they report ultimately to him and he is ultimately responsible. Trust, openness and honesty are imperative in all staff and player communications.

7. Create an environment of care, enjoyment, fun :

The head coach is vital in creating a positive working environment. The manner with which he conducts himself with regard to the staff and players creates an atmosphere of enjoyment and fun. If he is seen to be thoughtful and caring in his dealings with the people he is responsible for, this will filter down through the group and help create a happy positive working environment that will greatly enhance the prospects of getting the best out of the staff and players.

In each coaching job that I have undertaken, I have attempted to apply the above principles of leadership that I am convinced have helped me make the teams that I have coached more successful and therefore achieve sustainable performance.
How to reach sustainable performance.

In my role as Head coach of various professional and International rugby teams, I have found that following certain basic principles has helped eno
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